Types of Archery Bows

We have looked at the list of archery equipment that you will need, let us look at the types of bows that you can consider when it comes to archery. So, what are the types of bows available for archery and how are they like?

 

  • Crossbows

For the bow hunters, this is one of the most hotly debated bows of all time. In as much we have this love-hate relationship with this kind of bow, it is here to stay.

In the simplest explanation, it is a simple compound bow that is mounted horizontally on a stock and it uses a standard trigger rather than the mechanical trigger release. The bow is usually drawn using a cocking device that normally pulls the string back and then locks it in a jaw. After which the trigger is usually squeezed so as to allow the string to retract just the same way the compound bow work and it then pushed the arrow in the downward range.

These kind of bows are easier to use and they can allow you to jump right into the bow bunting sport without too much practice. They are also the easiest to learn to use when it comes to archery.

They are mainly used in hunting because they can be quite rather very accurate when used correctly and are also able to shoot rapidly at heavier draw heights. They also have a much longer range.

You can also incorporate this kind of bow for your target practice if you prefer. The difference between the target-shooting crossbow and the hunting crossbow is that the target crossbow has a much lower draw height. This is to enable a much less force to penetrate the target.

The target crossbow also is much smaller and can be easily transported from one location to another and definitely more fun to shoot with.

  • Compound Bows

Developed in the 1960s, the compound bow has a lot more in common with the traditional bow. (as per the model A and horse-drawn carriage). In terms of shape and string, it differentiated itself from the longbow and became something entirely new. The compound bow has five most basic parts: riser, wheels, string, and limbs.

This is the bow that is commonly used for hunting. If you would like to take it a notch higher, you can use it for bow fishing, though buying a compound bow specifically for this it might be a little bit expensive compared to the recurve bow.

The foundation of the bow is the riser and it generally holds the sights, arrow rest and the stabilizer. The limbs are also attached to it.

The bow limbs store the energy when drawing the bow. This is because more energy is stored when the limbs are being flexed up until the release point. The cams and the sting assembly go hand in hand with the compound bow. Upon release, the limbs will spring back to position while at the same time the cable will be rotating the cams forward which in turn accelerates the string to propel the arrow.

Due to their pulley system, they become the best bet for hunting because the pulley system gives them a great force that they can impact on the arrow during shooting. You can also use this for target practice as well. This makes the most efficient bow currently on the market.

Due to its energy efficiency, this makes it a go-to bow for both beginners and experienced archers as well.

  • Recurve Bows

This a bow you have probably seen. It is used in movies and television shows generally due to its stylish and traditional appeal.

The biggest plus for this bow is that it has the ability to have higher energy content and at the same time maintain shorter length than the longbow. The reason is that the bow tips curve away from the archer hence it is more efficient and pretty much portable compared to the other bows.

The uses for this bow are many but its major highlight is the use it gains in competitions, think, Olympics. Actually, when it comes to the Olympics archery, the recurve bow is the only bow style allowed.

The recurve bow can be used for more elite competitions but if you wish, you can get one for your target practice hobby or use the more traditional archery styles.

 

  • Longbow

This kind of bow is much similar to the recurve in that it the most popular traditional archery bow used. It is also the oldest bow and it can be seen by the number of times it’s used in the medieval movies.

It is simple in appearance in that it is just a string attached to a piece of wood. Do not let this deceive you, its simplicity is its source of strength.

When spread out, the bow gently curves towards the archer. It is the most challenging bow to use may be because it does not have the recurve bow curves or even the technology behind the compound bow.

It is easy to make and it happens to be very popular with amateur bow shooters.

Due to technological advances, the longbow is rather outdated when it comes to war use, but rather very popular which archers with all level of skill.

Under traditional use, it is used for hobby purposes and also medieval reenactments.

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